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3rd Meeting of the 202nd Session (2022-2023)

Developments in the Field of Cancer Immunotherapy

Dr Stefan N Symeonides

Dr Stefan N Symeonides

Dr Stefan N Symeonides MB BChir PhD (Cantab) MRCP(UK)(Med Onc) FRCPE
Senior Clinical Lecturer in Medical Oncology
Cancer Research UK Edinburgh Centre
MRC Institute of Genetics & Molecular Medicine
The University of Edinburgh

On Monday 28th November 2022, at 7pm

To improve cancer outcomes, we need to expand our treatment options and better tailor these to individual patients. The last decade has seen cancer immunotherapy take a huge step forward to become a new key component of cancer therapy that also brings with it a potential for more durable benefit for some patients with advanced disease. Progress continues at pace with new agents, combinations and personalisation strategies, as well as developments in managing immune-related side-effects. This is already changing outcomes for many patients and the hope is to expand its role to others, while increasing the proportion of patients that may have that durable benefit.

Stefan Symeonides is a Medical Oncologist and Senior Clinical Lecturer at the Cancer Research UK Edinburgh Centre (University of Edinburgh) and at the linked Edinburgh Cancer Centre (NHS Lothian), as well as having a Pharmaceutical Medicine role in CRUK’s Centre for Drug Development. After clinical training in the UK (Cambridge, Edinburgh), Australia (Melbourne) & New Zealand (Christchurch), and research in academia, clinic & industry, he now leads the Edinburgh Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre, where he provides the link between Edinburgh’s laboratory discoveries and their clinical development. In the clinic, he runs the Edinburgh Phase I Cancer Trials Unit and also has a specialty focus on renal cancer. His research spans cytotoxic, small molecule, metabolic and even psychological therapies, but his main focus is immunotherapies, where he is the clinical lead for the Edinburgh Cancer Immunology network.